Why So Serious?

Why So Serious?

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Two factors help influence my decorating choices- age and edge, and thank goodness for them! It’s not uncommon for interior designers to bring the most serious, the most formal touch to a home where each piece is perfect yet somehow rooms lack personality and spontaneity.

In addition to touches of home humor, consider rock art for an otherwise very traditional setup. These photographers, like Danny Clinch, are the absolute best in the business (with a price tag that reflects it), and their work adds the attitude to inspire the entire room.

The image is of Jenny Lewis by Autumn De Wilde.

 

A Nightmare Indeed- Part II

A Nightmare Indeed- Part II

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On Tuesday, I used the recently listed ‘Nightmare On Elm Street’ property to demonstrate a common design mistake: large, oversized/overscaled furniture weighs down a room’s look and feel. The home’s living room (pictured) is a veritable catalogue of design and decorating flaws, but I only wanted to focus on the biggest offenders (as I saw them); rounding out the top two is misuse/misappropriation/mistake of ‘a pop of color’.

First and foremost, a pop of color should be fun and spontaneous rather than deliberate and predictable, and nothing speaks to deliberation more than matching. Color should also be applied conservatively, in small doses (pillows, candles, cool objects, books, flowers, art) rather than painted on with a big brush. Additionally, consider playing with pattern over solids- bold solids tend to land with a thud. A flat roman shade in a cheeky plaid like this one from Robert Allen would have added a sense of whimsy and style to that room.

A Nightmare Indeed- Part I

A Nightmare Indeed- Part I

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I opened a conversation on my Facebook page yesterday regarding this historic house for sale- historic if you’re a fan of the horror genre. The ‘Nightmare On Elm Street’ property has hit the market, boasting some interesting design modifications since its 1984 debut.

If you browse through the photos, you’ll notice specific and oddball design choices (orange Caesar stone countertops), but the living room/den (pictured) is a teaching tool on two fronts.

I wrote last month about The Fit Factor, the oversized scale and proportion of furniture in most American homes. The sofa/coffee table combo in the ‘Nightmare’ house is a perfect example of how large, heavy pieces weigh down the room and obstruct visual flow, especially in contrast to the clean lines of contemporary styling.

Look for Part II later this week where I’ll discuss the other major mistake in this room, a topic near and dear to my heart: the design cliche known as ‘a pop of color’.