The Nontraditional Bride

The Nontraditional Bride

BLOG

 

FOLLOW MILE HIGH STYLE HERE

Instagram         

Although bridal styling is not among my main services, having recently spoken at a Denver wedding expo as well as designed the office for top wedding and event planner Calluna Events, I’ve got brides on the brain- specifically, how to buck convention and embrace all the style possibilities inherent in the matrimonial occasion. In short, here’s how to be a nontraditional bride.

THE DRESS

Style- The starting point for the entire affair, your wedding dress will be (most likely) the most expensive article of clothing you’ll ever buy. The ability to spend a few thousand dollars on a dress, with impunity, provides an amazing opportunity to buy a designer you’ve always loved but could never afford (or justify). Splurging on a gorgeous outfit that you’ll be able to wear again is my top recommendation for the rogue bride . Jolene Peterson of Calluna Events, in a champagne handmade gown from LA’s Les Habitudes, models this look to perfection.

Color- Whether your dress comes from a bridal store or the fashion runway, consider a different color. Cream, champagne, and blush are the closest cousins to ‘wedding white’, but you have an entire rainbow of options. Lilac, pale yellow, seafoam green, and metallics of gold and silver are all beautifully out of the box.

Silhouette- Short wedding dresses are becoming increasingly popular, and here in Colorado (where the majority of ceremonies are outdoors), avoiding hemline contact with grass, dirt and other environmental offerings is ideal. With options ranging from mid-calf to knee-length, mid-thigh to mini, any variation looks modern, fresh and totally stylish.

SHOES

Color– Traditional bridal footwear is being increasingly eclipsed by color. A pop of red, yellow, royal blue or hot pink under your dress is an irresistible touch.

Style- Depending on the location and venue of your ceremony, you might consider a more casual style. Flip flopsballet flats and sneakers* all demonstrate a non-negotiable individuality.

ACCESSORIES

Hair- If a veil is not quite your thing, consider a vintage (or vintage-looking) barrette. As Great Gatsby fever sweeps the nation (and will surely infiltrate the wedding world), you’ll be seeing many more ornate headpieces evoking 1920s glamour.

Etc- Some final touches include painting your nails a bold color (OPI’s Big Apple Red, You Don’t Know Jacques, or Malaga Wine), wearing a retro-inspired red lipstick (Nars’ Jungle Red or Heat Wave), and sporting a vintage fur stole or short jacket (for a Fall/Winter wedding).

*Thank you to ACImagery for this photo.

Elements of Style II

Elements of Style II

BLOG

 

FOLLOW MILE HIGH STYLE HERE

Instagram         

I graduated from Georgetown with a Sociology & Psychology degree, and thinking that I wanted to work for the FBI, wrote my thesis on women in law enforcement. Had I known the true path of my career, I would have begun tracking the psycho-social factors contributing to great style. Although I started my true studies a few years post-graduation (10, to be exact), the last 3 years have been enlightening; the true elements comprising great style are not quite what you’d expect. I presented my overall thesis here, citing creativity, budget, discipline and desire, but I neglected a very important factor that has become increasingly obvious to me over time.

Without a doubt, comfort in your own skin, your ability to not let perceived flaws or imperfections dictate what you wear and how you wear it, affects everything. Our home-grown list of grievances is long and detailed: skinny ankles, big calves, veiny legs, busted-up knees (mine), muscular legs, big hips, small butt (mine again), big butt, tummy (and again), small boobs, big boobs, broad shoulders, back fat, sigh… Myriad perceived ‘problems’ for women who are beautiful and fit (and lovely, accomplished, and the rest). For those who can silence the inner critic, a whole new world of style can be yours.