John Varvatos Pop-Up Shop!

John Varvatos Pop-Up Shop!

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Guys, if you haven’t made it down to Denver’s best boutique, Goldyn, here is your chance! They’re hosting a pop-up shop on Saturday September 6th (11a-8p).

John Varvatos is one of the best things happening in men’s fashion today. From the cool-factor of the clothing, to the ads featuring iconic musicians photographed by rock photographer Danny Clinch, to the New York City storefront acquisition of legendary music club CBGB, his brand embodies a strong Rock N Roll sensibility that separates him from the pack. If Dean or McQueen were still alive, they’d be wearing Varvatos.

More details and RSVP here!

 

Can You Afford A Stylist?

Can You Afford A Stylist?

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One of the largest impediments to hiring a fashion stylist is the matter of money. In my experience, people both overestimate the cost of working with me and underestimate their ability to pay for it. There’s a very simple way to answer the question of  ‘can I afford it’ and it involves an honest exercise.

Add up all the tops from Anthropologie that you’ve worn only a few times, the Nordstrom Rack purchases that (individually) don’t drain the bank account, the piles and piles of cheap jewelry from ‘here and there’, and the items purchased on trips, impulse buys and anything else that lacks cohesion and purpose.

The honest math should show that you have spent over $1,000 on things and stuff that, simply, don’t do enough for you. Instead, consider investing that money in your style future. $1,000 won’t buy you an entirely new wardrobe, but it will cover the beginning stage.

Details of my services are available here.

 

 

 

 

The Sale Shopper

The Sale Shopper

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If you had to guess, what percentage of your wardrobe consists of pieces purchased on sale? And of those items, how many would you have paid full-price for? You can probably see where I’m going with this…

Sales are great, and I’ll often encourage my clients to make bigger purchases when that 15%+ helps skim the top. But sales can also be traps that encourage price-tag shopping and incentivize bulk buying. Price-tag shopping occurs when you buy items simply because they’re on sale, items you’d never pay full-price for. Bulk buying involves purchasing multiples (colors, slight style variations) when you don’t need them. In both instances, your forgoing smart shopping for the dazzle of the discount.

Now, is buying the same top in 3 different colors going to break the bank? No. Are you going to have to re-finance because you have the scarf in stripes and polka-dots? Of course not. Typically, however, if you fall for sale traps once or twice, you fall for them often, and the money really does start adding up, your closet is bloated, and you’re no closer to having what you really need. You can temper these tendencies with the following criteria: if you wouldn’t pay full-price for it, put it back.

Novelty Style

Novelty Style

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Of all style conundrums, the most popular among friends, clients, and just about everyone I know, involves the fallacy that new = better, or what I like to call Novelty Style. Somehow, if you just bought it (a top, jeans, shoes, jewelry, anything), it looks better and makes an outfit more stylish. In reality, after one or two wears, the novelty wears off and you’re once again in search of something else new.

I understand this cycle very well. Not only were my 20s a testament to novelty style (with Barneys, Bergdorfs & Bendels reaping the benefits), I still feel the thrill of a new piece and suspect I always will. However, I also understand that this habit is lazy, costly, and detrimental to the ultimate style goal: to shop your closet and make new outfits out of old clothing. To that end, you have three tools to help break the cycle.

Discipline– Perhaps surprisingly, the single best tool to bring into your closet is self control: to say no, to resist the easy urge (and splurge), to shop smart, or (temporarily) stop shopping at all.

Creativity– Abandon the rules and rigidity of this goes with that and open your mind to the possibilities. This is a mental exercise; if your brain is not engaged, you’re spinning your wheels.

OutsourcingThis is what I do. About 75% of my business involves making old new again, and better yet, I can teach you the tools to do it yourself.